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Reply to: ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside,’ Seen As Sexist, Frozen Out By Radio Stations : NPR

I’m glad this sparked overwhelming push back.

  1. I like this song. Dean Martin’s version is my favorite.
  2. I strongly object to to everything becoming politicized.
  3. It’s a song which makes it Art, maybe not high art but it’s Art. I don’t like censorship of art.
  4. Let’s be careful not to make this into an Orwellian world controlled by thought police.
  5. Lighten up.

 

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In reply to: Distributed Digital Transformation | Ton Zijlstra

Source: Read: Distributed Digital Transformation | Chris Aldrich

Yes Ton you are right.

We need to learn to see the cumulative impact of a multitude of efforts, while simultaneously keeping all those efforts visible on their own. There exist so many initiatives I think that are great examples of how distributed digitalisation leads to transformation, but they are largely invisible outside their own context, and also not widely networked and connected enough to reach their own full potential. They are valuable on their own, but would be even more valuable to themselves and others when federated, but the federation part is mostly missing.
We need to find a better way to see the big picture, while also seeing all pixels it consists of. A macroscope, a distributed digital transformation macroscope.

Great article!

Yes we need a macroscope.  The first practical thing that needs to be done now is to publicly catalog all these initiatives as a first step in building that macroscope.  Part of that cataloging (indexing) requires defining just what is a worthy initiative and explain it. Then we we figure out how to network.  And part of it needs to be practical, boots on the ground stuff, because we don’t have infinite time to come up with perfect solutions.

Those steps I listed above, are doable right now.  Somebody needs to start. If there is a way I can help, let me know.

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In Reply to: Directory Features. Kicks Condor.

I’ve worked out a search index that’s entirely done in JavaScript

 

If you chose to go with a search feature, I was going to add you to the search engines at the bottom of Indieseek’s SERP like I did with Wiby.me.  That way I could share traffic – like someday when I have traffic, with your directory.  So, please, add working out a search string for that js search to your bucket list of future stuff to do.

But in any event I think your adding search is wise.  I gives the end user options.

I think one of my primary questions these days is: will the future be blogcentric? I feel like things are going to change. Although they could get more hyperactive.

 

I think our choice of tools is widening.  I’m going to experiment with Dokuwiki.  And you really need to check out Federated Wiki.  It’s that copying feature, in essence “forking” another persons post, that really caught my eye and made me think back to all your conversations with h0p3.  Anyway, I think blogs are just one tool in the box.

Features:

We talked before about these.  Right now on Indieseek I have ratings (stars) and Comments enabled.  I addition to the public using them, I intend to use them to write comments about certain sites on things I notice or recommendations I may have about the service or thing.  This means I can be more neutral in my descriptions of listings.

On the usability front: since I added Indieseek search to my browser, I notice I search my own directory more!  Interesting that I’m that lazy. Heh.

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In Reply to: Deplatforming and making the web a better place

Yes.  This is one part of the process and a good first step.  The Hippies complained about the 1950’s being too rigid and repressive, but at least most of the crackpots of the extreme Left and Right never got a platform beyond a mimeograph machine and handing out pamphlets on street corners back then.  Deplatforming is long overdue.

But the other part, is the current state of journalism.  All too often, editors and reporters from reputable media outlets, seek out reactions, comments or statements from these extremists which also gives them mass exposure and legitimacy.  I suppose it helps ratings, but that too has to stop.  They need to have better editorial control.

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In Reply to:  Manton Reece – The way out

I think Manton nailed the big picture on this one pretty good.

I think we should consider forums again too.

Smaller social networks: Many people are looking for “the next Twitter”, but it’s not enough to replace Twitter with a new platform and new leadership. Some problems are inevitable when power is concentrated in only 2-3 huge social networks…

I’m going to put a plug in here for the lowly forum as part of the solution for smaller social networks.  A forum can cover topic specific threads much better than any social network I have seen.  Don’t discount them because they are old school.  Forums are not perfect, but they are a good, if not the best, tool for a narrow niche social network, until we can invent something better.

As big general topic networks, yeah Micro.blog, blogs and Mastodon are better.

As Manton says there has been a lot of talk about social networks recently.  I wish we were talking about forums more in these discussions as part of the solution.   Blogs and forums.

 

 

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In reply to: Ticker Tape Parade.

What no black background with with neon green text?  😀

Seriously, I really like this.  At first I was disoriented for a second because I was expecting rigid and flat.  But then it just all clicks and makes so much sense.  The threading and the different sub styles for different post types all work really well together.  Colors are good.  Most important, it’s highly readable.  Very cool.

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In reply to: Blogs in the Wild

I think the Indieweb is aware of the search problem but they have been focused on getting the essentials for individual blogs and stuff you can do with it up and running first.  I’m excited about their outreach to students and educators because I see students and academics seeing the utility for them straight off.

I don’t see mass adoption happening until WordPress builds it into WordPress.com, then lookout world!

But that’s okay. I think what you and I are doing will go like this:

  1. We hunt for homegrown blogs, sites, wikis and such just as we are right now.

  2. We build directories, webrings and syndication services that map out this world.

  3. The thing becomes a self-sustaining flotilla of: a) Talking, pitching in with each other’s projects. b) Experimenting with the format—I like to think that we’re developing an alternate timeline, as if blogs had replaced Friendster/Myspace rather than these other derivative networks. c) And customizing these directories and projects for subcommunities.

 

Those social network silos did a couple of good things even if they are going sour now. 1. They broke Google’s stranglehold on the web and getting found, 2. They offered an alternative advertising choice besides Adsense and Adwords.  This is something even Microsoft/Bing and Yahoo before it could not do.  They proved to the rest of Silicon Valley it could be done and Google was not invincible.  So I’m not anxious for the social silos to crumble too fast, I also get a fair amount of traffic from them.

(And that maybe part of the lack of wider uptake of our directory, webring, blogroll strategy, everyone is getting some traffic now by syndicating to the silos so they don’t see a problem.)

Anyway, I’m not willing to go back to Google being the sole Gate Keeper of the Web. I’ll fight that, no matter how puny my efforts might be. There is a story behind this: you have never been carpet bombed until Google has carpet bombed you.  I’ve been collateral damage in that.  It was things like webrings, directory listings, and a huge network of hyperlinks from little websites that kept my directory on life support until I could rebuild elsewhere. That’s kinda why I started reminiscing about them when the topic came up.  No I’ll never go back to Google controlling the web. I’ll never take traffic for granted again.  Part of the reason I’ve been posting so much is to try and build a reader base before syndication gets shut off.

So yeah, you and I are experimenting with versions of these guerrilla search tools.  We will see if there is any life left in them.

I can roll out a directory ready for submissions in a few weeks if I have to.  All the old directory scripts are a little long in the tooth but I already know the one I would use and how I would use it.  I can roll out webring hosting too since I found that Ringlink perl script. Or you can or we both can.  Again, if need be.

Public uptake is the key, uptake by bloggers and webmasters.  If they are not willing to list themselves, if the public is not willing to to use these to browse, then we have little chance.

Marketing plays in here. I just put up a little advertising banner for the blog directory.  Early signs are it has more visitors checking it out. We’ll see if that’s a temporary blip or a trend.

Anyway it’s fun.

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LEECHING AND LINKING IN THE HYPERTEXT KINGDOMi

Replying to: Indieweb.xyz: Difficult or Silo?

Heh, well everything not on your own domain is a silo, or at least I can make that argument.  Not all silo’s are bad we’ve all just gotten sloppy talking as if they are.  Silo’s become particularly bad when they become monopolies: ie. Facebook, Twitter, Google.  But what you are trying to do with Indieweb.xyz is exactly the opposite, that is create another independent outlet for both articles to be found and also blogs to be found.  We need more of these not less.

Indieweb et al.: Commendably, you have built Indieweb.xyz using Indieweb tech.  But I’m not sure if the Indieweb, as it sits right now, is the best audience.  I mean, we Indiewebbers all “got ours”, we can talk to each other directly anytime we want, we have: webmentions, chat rooms on Indieweb.org, Slack, IRC and maybe other places, we have Twitter, we have our own Indie News self serve aggregator, newsletters and most of what we talk about with each other is Indeweb related.  And there is nothing wrong with any of that, it’s just that, maybe Indieweb.xyz gets overlooked by that audience.  I see you have opened things up so that more diverse non-indieweb equipped blogs can syndicate and I think this is wise.

There are blogs and bloggers out there, basically talking to themselves because nobody can find them.  They don’t know if anybody is reading or appreciates what they post because nobody comments and they have no clue about Indieweb.  They want to reach out but they don’t know how, maybe they aren’t techie, maybe they majored in English at Uni.  How do we reach them?  How do we get them to get off their duffs and nailing manifestos on Indieweb.xyz?  I have to confess, there are times when I forgot to syndicate to xyz because my post was not linking or Indieweb related.  I’m getting over that.

Difficulty: I think it is best if we have to do a little work to syndicate to xyz.  I’ve thought about what if we could syndicate via RSS but that would spam xyz out.  It does not need all my drivel, only my better (or longer) posts.  And if you incorporated RSS then the real spammers would take over sooner or later.

There is a generational thing here too.  I’m not talking about the Indieweb, but others on the web.  They have become passive, or at least it seems that way to me.

Keep at it.  You are experimenting with something good.  When all the massive silos like FB and Twitter go down or wall themselves off, people will discover the need for places like Indieweb.xyz.  They just don’t know it yet.

 

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